Francis Bacon and The King James Bible

Francis Bacon and The King James Bible
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In his first regnal year, King James presided over a conference between Episcopalians and Puritans. The primary topic for discussion concerned the numerous, and sometimes conflicting versions of the Bible—most of which were not written in English.

The Puritan leader John Rainoldes stressed the need for a uniform English translation of the Bible. The King approved the idea, and commissioned a force of 54 translators to execute the project. The translators were then arranged into six groups operating under specific guidelines. It was the consummate set-up. Bacon had every intention of producing his own translation of the Bible since his teen years, and the King provided the perfect opportunity and means for its implementation—along with the ideal cover for which Bacon was only too happy to insure that James would receive full credit for the undertaking. Hence, the “Bacon Bible” would forever be known as the King James Version by virtue of Bacon‘s need for a patron to finance such an immense project, and a front man behind which he could operate with complete invisibility.