Book 11 Reigns of Henry VI and V

Book 11 Reigns of Henry VI and V
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BOOK XI

THE REIGNS OF HENRY IV AND HENRY V COMPRISING A PERIOD OF TWENTY-TWO YEARS
AND TEN MONTHS.
Chapter I
HENRY IV SIRNAMED OF BOLINGBROKE

HENRY DUKE OF LANCASTER, SIRNAMED OF BOLINGBROKE, the place of his birth[1], having been proclaimed the 30th of September, took that very day the reins of the government. As the Parlia­ment then assembled was called in Richard’s name, and as their authority ceased upon his being deposed, Henry’s first care was to call another. He was con­tented, however, with impowering the same represen­tatives, to make, with the House of Lords, a new Parliament under his authority; and, after a few days interruption, the same Parliament met again on the 6th of October, as though it had been called by the new King.

Edmund Mortimer Earl of March, considering it would be no less dangerous than fruitless, at such a juncture, to assert his just right to the crown, retired to his Lordship of Wigmore[2], near the borders of Wales. The more incontestable his title was, the more reason he had to dread the new King’s jealousy. So, giving way to the torrent which he could not stem, he resolved to live in retirement, without showing the least ambition, or the least uneasiness, at the injustice that was done him.

The Parliament being assembled, Thomas Arundel Archbishop of Canterbury made a long speech, tending to inspire a high opinion of the advantages procured to the kingdom by the late revolution. He enlarged chiefly on the disorders of the late reign, and assured them, that the new Sovereign proposed to govern after a very different manner, and to preserve to all their rights and liberties. This prelate had been banished the realm in the late reign, and Roger Walden, who was appointed in his room, had hitherto performed the Archiepiscopal functions. But as Arundel was not canonically deposed, the Parliament in their first session, ordered that he should resume his dignity, and the rather as the other had not yet obtained the Pope’s con­firmation. The Archbishop’s speech, and some pre­liminary formalities, were the only things remarkable in the first session of the new Parliament, which was ad­journed to the 14th of October. This adjournment was necessary in order to prepare for the coronation, which was to be on the 13th.